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Maria Stuart

Two religions divide a people and a land. Two rulers exploit religion to control their people.

Terrorists, conspiracies, arbitrary arrest and detention, interrogation and intercepted correspondence – it’s unsettling how human behaviour at the highest level of power doesn’t change.

Scary Little Girls’ second fringe production was an adaption of Schiller’s Maria Stuart, performed at the Union Theatre, Southwark in 2005.

Rebecca Mordan’s strident Elizabeth commands the stage like a regal battleship.

What’s On

Inventively directed, Ryan McBryde creates a conspiratorial atmosphere with an excellent cast.

What’s On

Lucinda Raikes’ Mary is alive, individual, feminine, manipulative yet heart-warming.

What’s On

Scary Little Girls insist that the German Playwright’s themes – asylum, religion and the State and civil rights still prevail in today’s post 9/11 climate – they’re not wrong.

Time Out

Scary Little Girl’s Maria Stuart has a clarity and purpose that drives into the imagination … An exciting, danger-edged production.

Reviews Gate

Papist versus Protestant, vulnerable ‘natural’ woman versus skilled but dehumanised political actress, it’s a great story. Ryan McBryde’s production opts for a daring time travelling portentousness … it very nearly achieves sublimity.

Time Out

Academic Review

A paper for the Contemporary Theatre Review in 2006, by Bettina Göbels and John Guthrie, considered our production of Maria Stuart alongside other productions around the same time.

Read the paper